Hearing Tests

Hearing impairment affects more than just your ability to hear — it affects your quality of life. Hearing Plus Audiology stresses the importance of an accurate and timely hearing test...

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Tinnitus Treatment

Though the common misconception about tinnitus is that it’s a disease, tinnitus is actually a medical condition characterized by persistent ringing in one or both ears that can only be heard by the affected individual...

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Child Hearing Treatment

Even though it’s essential to social, emotional, and cognitive development, hearing is often a sense that’s overlooked medically. Early identification and treatment of hearing loss in children can lessen the negative impacts it will have on a child’s development...

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Hearing Aid Repairs

Even if you take care of your hearing aids and keep up with regular maintenance, time takes its toll on all technology, and it’s possible that yours will eventually wear out through the course of normal use...

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Balance Evaluation

Dizziness or loss of balance, sometimes referred to as vertigo, is the second most common complaint that doctors hear. According to the National Institutes of Health, dizziness will occur in 70 percent of Americans at some point in their lives...

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Aural Rehabilitation

Aural rehabilitation is the process of helping someone effectively adjust to and manage his or her hearing loss. Methods of rehabilitation are focused on helping overcome the challenges caused by hearing loss, therefore improving the quality of day-to-day life...

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Earwax Management

Earwax, that yellowish-brown substance produced by the glands of the external ear, may conjure the ick factor for many people, but it actually serves a pretty important purpose...

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Custom Hearing Protection

Hearing loss happens for many reasons, one of the most popular being exposure to loud noise (noise-induced hearing loss, or NIHL). Repeated exposure to sound levels above 85 decibels (the sound of a bulldozer) can cause permanent, irreparable hearing loss...

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Captioned Phones

A captioned telephone is a phone that has a built-in screen to display what the person on the other line is saying in text...

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Musician Monitors & Custom Earbuds

To perform your best, you need to hear your best. Stage performers are routinely exposed to hearing damage both from amplifiers and the ear monitors that must be turned up to potentially harmful levels just so that they can be heard above the music...

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Frequently Asked Questions About Hearing Health Care

I really don’t want to deal with how much time it takes to insert my hearing aids, perform daily maintenance, change batteries, and remove my hearing aids. What are my options?
Many practices offer clean and checks for your devices, in which the maintenance is done for you. Aside from promotional periods, or times that your provider offers to have your devices cleaned, it will likely be a service you’ll pay for. Maintenance is important to ensure your devices last and operate effectively. Inserting hearing aids and changing batteries should become part of your daily routine, and making time for doing those things is important for hearing your best. If you’d like to avoid inserting hearing aids and changing batteries, consider a surgically implanted device, which will operate without daily attention.
How do I clean my hearing aids?
Ask your hearing care provider to walk you through how to clean your devices, as each type of device will have components that are unique to that style of hearing aid. To clean the devices on your own, you’ll need a brush tool that can clean the small contours where dirt, dust, and earwax become trapped. The hearing aid should be cleaned daily with a moist cleansing wipe. If the microphone or earmold areas are blocked, use the brush to clear them.
How often should I be wearing my hearing aids?
You should wear your hearing aids for as long as you feel they are necessary each day, or for as long as they are comfortable. Most battery life expectations are based on wearing your devices for 12 to 16 hours each day.
Are hearing aids comfortable?
When you visit a hearing care specialist and get fit for hearing aids, your devices are molded specifically to the contours of your ear, meaning they should fit cleanly and comfortably. If irritation or discomfort becomes an issue, talk to your hearing care provider about using a new earmold material that does not irritate your skin, or having new molds of your ears taken so that your devices fit more comfortably.
Why do I have a problem with background noise?
Hearing aids with digital signal processing help to differentiate between speech and noise, and they turn down the volume of what they identify as noise rather than speech. But no technology is perfect, and none will completely remove the problems associated with trying to listen in background noise. In these cases, strategic positioning in listening situations can help alleviate background noise. Most hearing aid microphones are geared toward listening to sounds that are in your field of view. Positioning yourself to communicate with people face-to-face is one method you can use to help block out background noise.
Can hearing aids make my hearing worse?
Hearing aids that aren’t fit to your unique hearing needs can do more harm than good. Most hearing aids focus on helping the user hear better by amplifying specific frequencies that are problem areas for that particular user. Amplifying a wider range of frequencies than necessary can cause more damage by overstimulating the healthy hair cells in the inner ear. By amplifying more sound than necessary, the risks are similar to listening to music too loudly. A proper hearing loss diagnosis and an accurate hearing aid fitting by a quality hearing care provider are important in maintaining your current hearing health and improving your hearing deficits.
What is the best way to clean/remove wax from my ears?
Earwax cleaning kits are available for purchase at most supermarkets and some grocery stores, and they are effective at removing excess wax. Typically, they consist of a solution that sits in the ear canal for several minutes to loosen cerumen, as well as a rubber bulb used to squirt warm water into the ear canal to clear out the wax.
Is it bad to use cotton swabs in your ears?
Cotton swabs can cause damage if they’re pushed too far into the canal or pushed against the sensitive eardrum. Depending upon the consistency of your earwax, they can also clog the canal, making it difficult to hear with your devices. Other cleaning methods are recommended.
How often should I get my hearing evaluated?
Yearly hearing checks are recommended for anyone beyond the age of 45, and intermittently from childhood throughout adulthood. If you feel your hearing has changed for any reason, or if it has been more than three years since your last screening, schedule a hearing check with your local hearing care provider.
What is the best way to manage itchy ears?
Itchy ears are common for first-time hearing aid users and users who have just purchased a new hearing system. If itching continues for more than a few days, and you have no skin allergies, asking your hearing care provider for a different size of speaker tip for your receiver-in-the-canal or behind-the-ear hearing aids will often stop the itching. For custom earmolds, itching may be caused by moisture and bacteria on the shell, in which case a hearing aid dryer with a UV light will help kill the bacteria and alleviate the problem. Store-bought itch relief creams may help. If all else fails, talk to your hearing care provider about other options.